Tag: speech

Apps we use everyday…

Apps we use everyday…

Working in adult out-patient, our iPads are now our new best friends!
Here are some speech/language/cognitive apps that we can’t live without:

For Attention/Concentration:
Stroop Effect
Doodle Find Pro
Alternating Trail Making Test
Visual Attention Therappy
iMazing
Constant Therapy
Lumosity for iPad

For Immediate/Short-Term Memeory
Blink Test
Crazy Copy
Sketchy Memory
Awesome Memory
Constant Therapy
Lumosity for iPad

For New Learning
Spaced Retrieval Therappy

For Problem Solving/Sequencing
Rush Hour
Flow
Where’s My Water?
Cut the Rope
Plants vs Zombies
Phlip
Constant Therapy
Lumosity for iPad

For Naming
4 pics 1 word
Little Riddles
Emoji Pop
Word Analogy
I Know
Charades
Clean Up
Chain of Thought
Hooked on Words

For Aphasia
Tactus Language Therappy
Lingraphica Small Talk and Talk Path
Constant Therapy
Yes-No

For Dysarthria
Bla Bla Bla
Pacesetter
Quick Voice
Tongue Twisters

For Dysfluency
Speech4Good

We know there are lots more…
Check out http://tactustherapy.com/adultapplist.pdf
for 190+iOS Apps for Adult Speech-Language Therapy

And please tell us the Apps that you can’t live without!!…

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How may I assist you?  Life as an SLP-A

How may I assist you? Life as an SLP-A

by Christine Botelho, BA

I have been a Speech Language Pathology Assistant for over 20 years, licensed in Massachusetts for 4 years (not all states require licensure). Use of Speech Language Pathology Assistants is not allowed in all areas of the Speech and Language field and it is not an easy position to acquire. I have been fortunate to have met Speech Language Pathologists who have given me the opportunities that I have had. I have worked in acute rehab settings, nursing homes, day hab programs, schools and private practice.

As an SLP-A , I have always worked with Speech Language Pathologists. Initially it is difficult to work with a new, unfamiliar SLP because of different treatment styles and expectations. I have found that the speech and language field can be extremely subjective.  A patient, given the same tests and acquiring the same results may have different goals and objectives created by different therapists.  The therapists may desire the same outcome yet approach the treatment from different directions.  Having had the opportunity to work with numerous Speech Language Pathologists has given me countless treatment strategies to refer to while I am working my patients.  Every SLP has their own style of treatment and each patient is an individual- what works for one patient may not work for the other.  It has been helpful to have multiple strategies to try.

My overall responsibility as an SLP-A is to comprehend the recommendations, goals and objectives of the supervising SLP and implement the treatment to maximize the patient’s success. An SLP-A needs to have a basic understanding of the disabilities they are working with. However, their greatest strength is in knowing what materials are available, with an ability to modify and create novel ones in order to motivate their patients.  I feel the optimal use of an SLP-A is to accomplish the “drill work” needed to attain the goals the SLP created.  Therefore, the needs of the patient and their rate of progress determines the ratio of SLP to SLP-A treatment.   ASHA has guidelines for supervision of SLP-A’s and I believe it is important to adhere to these in order to assure the best outcomes. In addition, as this website shows, it’s lonely out there! We need SLPs to bounce ideas off of and to make sure we are on the right track. Our training and experience only gets us so far. The SLP has the education and the responsibility to drive the treatment plan.

Often I look back over my career and remember my patients from the early days and think how much more I could help them, knowing what I know now. If my career has taught me anything it’s that we have to have an appreciation for what we don’t know with the courage to ask questions and continue to search for answers even in the most challenging situations. It is becoming too easy to blame the patients and families for a lack of progress instead confronting our own limitations. I enjoy learning new things in order to help my patients. One reason I like being an SLP-A is that you always have someone to consult and brainstorm with. It is harder to feel defeated when you are part of a team. My best experiences have been working with SLPs that share my ideology and philosophy.

As our field continues to grow and change, I would like to see SLP-A’s working with SLP’s all settings with services reimbursed by all insurances in order to reach as many patients as possible. After all, I bet everyone could use a little assistance.

About the Author

Christine Botelho is an SLP-A with a Bachelor’s Degree in Communication Disorders from Bridgewater State College. When not amazing her school based caseload with a variety of original materials, fun reinforcers and tireless energy, Chris can be found in southeastern Massachusets enjoying time with her family and learning archery.
Contact Chris at sb01@comcast.net.

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I hope you had a good day

I hope you had a good day

By Lisa Yauch-Cadden

“I hope you had a good day”

My family and I are ABC News fans. I always loved Peter Jennings. I, like many people was saddened at his passing, and I thought my news program would never be the same. I liked Peter’s sense of gravity and calm. He was always well so spoken and articulate, even in times of crisis, even when he was speaking extemporaneously – now that was a man you could trust. I now like Diane Sawyer very much, better in fact than I thought I would. But in between Peter and Diane, there was Charlie Gibson, and I loved Charlie. I thought he was great on Good Morning America, was happy when they brought him back and was really happy when he picked up the evening news. He had a fatherly, folksy way of delivering the news, was also well spoken and he had a great sign off – “I’m Charles Gibson and I hope you had a good day”. I loved that! What a great way to end a newscast. After all the bad news he’d delivered, he encouraged us take a moment to reflect on our day, and for me, that was refreshing, because I rarely had an opportunity to think about that when I was working 8, 10, 12 hours a day and always wondering what I had to do next.

I find that even now, when I am working just 30-35 hours a week, primarily in one location, with very little travel, that I can still get caught up in my day; rushing from patient to patient, worrying about productivity, always thinking: What do I have to do next? What else can I get done? What have I left undone? What’s on the schedule for tomorrow? Only recently, have I been able to slow my thought processes to reflect on my day. Was it a good day? Did I make a difference? Did I help someone? Did I contribute? Lately, I have been able to answer “Yes” to these questions, and to answer Charlie, I am having more “good days”.

So what’s changed? My caseload is about the same as it was a year ago. It goes up and down with the hospital census (and the flu season). The out-patient schedule is fairly constant. The productivity demands are the same. There has been no significant change in personnel as it relates to my position. So the difference must be me. I have changed how I look at my job. I am still cognizant of the productivity demands. I am still accountable to lots of people, but my top priority is to be of service to my patients – to do the best job I can and to provide them with as much information as possible to make decisions about their care, as it relates to my portion of the treatment plan (usually swallowing). I spend time educating patients and families, reviewing MBSs in detail, providing treatment beyond just the diagnostic kind, establishing home programs and making sure they understand what their options are. I am not successful 100% of the time, but more often than not, I feel like I am making a difference. When I reflect on my day, I can say, “Yes, it was a good day”.

I think if we can all find those small moments, those 1 or 2 patients, that if not for you, they might not be doing as well, that through your knowledge or kindness, you improved the quality of their life or their opportunity for a better outcome. If we can reflect on those things at the end of the day, we can all have a good day and look forward to a better tomorrow.

About the author

Lisa Yauch-Cadden was born and raised in the Detroit, Michigan area. She has a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology and a Master’s in Speech Language Pathology from the University of Michigan. She has worked as an SLP in nearly all facets of the field: skilled nursing facilities, home care, acute care, transitional care, medical offices and schools. Throughout her career as a therapist, manager and business owner, Lisa has never strayed from providing direct line service, including state of the art evaluations using FEES/FEESST and MBS. While she needs no accolades to do her job, she is deserving of many. Her tireless efforts to advance the best clinical practices in Speech Language Pathology have changed lives for her patients, her clinical fellows, and those of us lucky enough to work with her on a regular basis. Contact Lisa at lycslp@gmail.com.

If you have something to say, please submit your article for consideration to lycslp@gmail.com. .…

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I have all the answers but nobody is asking me any questions

I have all the answers but nobody is asking me any questions

By Marguerite Mullaney

“I have all these answers but nobody is asking me any questions!”

The words echoed down the muggy hallway of an Alzheimer’s unit one hot August afternoon as I was hurrying along to see my next patient. They stopped me in mid step. Many times, a patient has managed to say the one thing I needed to hear at a particular turning point in my career. However, on this occasion, the message was shouted by somebody not on my list with no assigned minutes. His sentiment was so poignant and so common it could be a defining human characteristic; the need to share our expertise. It is a want that resonated deep within me and I took a few minutes, unbillable minutes finding the man and asking him a question.

We spend years becoming speech language pathologists. Studies are not enough to get the seal of approval. There are tests to pass, followed by a lengthy fellowship under the watchful eye of another person already judged to be an expert. Even certification and licensure is a process and requires constant education to renew yearly.

Yet, having completed the all basics and continuing to achieve certification and licensure yearly, I find nobody is asking me the question I so desperately want to answer. If I had a chance to answer one question for the next generation of SLP’s, I already know what I want to tell them. It would be the same message given to me by one of my graduate supervisors.

I was her first student. She was my first supervisor with an adult neurogenic population. We spent the autumn of 1987 driving each other crazy and getting in each other’s way. She wasn’t easy to learn from and I wasn’t particularly bright, but we bumbled along with a minimum of chaos. Then dysphagia struck!
Swallowing was a bit new to SLP in those days. Not every clinician was practicing it. I was lucky. My supervisor was confident enough to admit her limitations. She showed me how to research the information I needed to fill the gaps in my university education. There was no dysphagia course offered in my graduate program way back in the dark ages of the eighties. Filling in my theory short comings was as easy as reading; Logemann and Rosenbeck became my bedtime stories for the remainder of grad school.

But, practical application of that knowledge takes…PRACTICE. You need to do an awful lot of awful bedside evaluations before you get really good. You need to see an ocean on aspiration on MBS before you can anticipate the drowning. How does a supervisor get a new clinician from inexperience to expertise without killing anybody? The answer is not, ‘puree and pudding thick liquids for everybody.’
Have the clinician answer this question just as my supervisor made me answer for each of our dysphagia patients 23 years ago: “What swallowing felony has this patient committed to be condemned to puree and/or thickened liquids?”

Too many times lately, I’ve read reports which did not reflect deficits significant enough to justify diet modification. Then there’s an increasingly popular trend in acute care summaries which apply the safest diet for swallowing purposes without consideration of the ramifications to the whole patient. Expensive MBSs performed in which no aspiration was detected or the trials were less than five swallows or limited trials of nectar, honey, and puree or not one compensatory strategy attempted have been in over-abundance in recent years. Bedside evaluations are sent with statements identifying aspiration to the point you must read them twice to be certain imaging was not conducted. In my pursuit of additional information for some of the more outrageous claims, I have heard such depressing excuses as:

1) I stopped the MBS because I was afraid the patient would aspirate.
2) The patient was coughing so I changed him to pudding at bedside.
3) I didn’t try thin during the MBS because at the nursing home he was already on nectar so I started there.
4) There’s no speech at nursing homes so I put her on the safest diet; puree and pudding thick.
5) A suspected timing delay of the epiglottis might be present and could lead to aspiration even though none was apparent on the MBS but to be safe I recommend nectar thick liquids.
6) I didn’t want to recommend something they might aspirate and get sued.
I wish there was no number 6. Sadly, I think it is the driving force behind many of the recommendations. But, I would spread some words of caution to my peers, especially the younger ones. The only thing that avoids litigation is luck. The thing that wins litigation is expertise and documentation.
If you make a swallowing recommendation in isolation of the needs of whole patient to save him from aspiration pneumonia and he goes into renal failure…that’s a big problem.

If you base your recommendations on what you suspect their living arrangements are and you are wrong…that’s a big problem.

If you are practicing limited trial MBS’s and ending them early because you are afraid the patient will aspirate…PLEASE stop conducting MBS and get more education!

Before you alter another diet ask yourself, “What swallowing felony has this patient committed to be condemned to puree and/or thickened liquids?”

About the author

Marguerite Mullaney was born and raised in and around the Boston area. She continues to make her home in the Commonweath and rarely finds it necessary to travel beyond the 128 belt. Her undergraduate program was completed at Bridgewater State College and she attended Northeastern University for graduate school. Adult neurological disorders has been the primary focus of her clinical practice. Her vast knowledge of the field, thoughtful, pragmatic approach and incredible sense of humor have enlightened and inspired her patients, staff and colleagues for over 20 years.

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