Tag: speech language

How Do You Count Success?

How Do You Count Success?

by Lisa Yauch-Cadden, MS CCC-SLP

Here at ASHA 2013, I am not standing on my soapbox, I am standing on a mountain peak. The journey to get here started when 2 friends began chatting about work, needing an ear to listen, a shoulder to cry on. That conversation grew into a website, a Facebook page and a Twitter feed. Now we have 1000 friends who can share ideas, frustrations, successes and be an ear to listen and a shoulder to cry on.

The climb up this mountain was not easy, but we persevered. We have much more to do, but the view is awesome and we can’t wait to see what awaits us. We invite all of our colleagues to join us in a conversation about our favorite subject: Communication disorders. Nothing is off limits, because there are no limits when we work together. Welcome to cccslp.net. Join us as we continue our climb.

About the author

Lisa Yauch-Cadden was born and raised in the Detroit, Michigan area. She has a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology and a Master’s in Speech Language Pathology from the University of Michigan. She has worked as an SLP in nearly all facets of the field: skilled nursing facilities, home care, acute care, transitional care, medical offices and schools. Throughout her career as a therapist, manager and business owner, Lisa has never strayed from providing direct line service, including state of the art evaluations using FEES/FEESST and MBS. While she needs no accolades to do her job, she is deserving of many. Her tireless efforts to advance the best clinical practices in Speech Language Pathology have changed lives for her patients, her clinical fellows, and those of us lucky enough to work with her on a regular basis. Contact Lisa at lycslp@gmail.com.…

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10s   by Gene Pizzolato, MS CCC-SLP

10s by Gene Pizzolato, MS CCC-SLP

1. Cookie of choice (for bedside swallow exams)
Lorna Doone

2. BDAE or WAB (for language testing)
BDAE

3. PICA +/- (for scoring)

+  Love the PICA!  In fact, I’ve used it for over 30 years with therapy plans and I call it a “Prompt-Cue Score” (PCS) system. After years of applying this format to my plans I considered it to be my own creation, until the PICA comparison was made by this web site’s Co-founder!. In any case my PCS provides me with great data to monitor progress.

4. Muppets or dwarves (for entertainment purposes only)

Muppets

4a. Favorite individual muppet

Fozzie Bear

5. Worst treatment moment of your career.

Medicaid Audit

6. Best advice you ever ignored.

“Don’t ever accept Medicaid payments”

7. Favorite, most reliable and practical treatment strategy.

I find that visual information organization strategies work well to support
information processing, comprehension and expressive language therapy.

8. Why SLP and not world domination?

Less stress

9. Would you do it all over again exactly the same way?

Absolutely not…… well maybe ….. actually “yes” with some adjustments.

 

10. What one thing do you still want to do before your career goals are completely achieved?

To organize my best therapy practices into a package that could be easily shared.

SHAMELESS SELF PROMOTION IN 30 WORDS (there actually is no word limit really so say whatever you want).

Gene Pizzolato, MS CCC SLP is a graduate of Columbia University and has been in private practice for 30 years. Specializing in working with school age children and adults with developmental disabilities, Gene has been a pioneer in the collaborative approach to treatment. Always a man of vision, Gene has been able to adapt his practice to meet the changing needs of the healthcare and school based communities as well as to continue to expand his clinical skills. As a mentor to countless students and new clinicians, Gene has entertained and inspired us as we endeavor to follow his lead.

Given this opportunity for shameless self-promotion, Gene would like to share with you some sage words of advice:

  1.  Be careful who you stand behind when scheduling your college courses, you may end up pursuing that line of study.
  2. If your business is based out of your home, a mudroom helps facilitate communication with itinerant therapists. You can leave them notes, schedules, reports, etc. And they can leave you cookies.
  3. Professional relationships, (all relationships, really) work best if they are based on mutual trust and respect.
  4. When asking for favors, it helps if you are charming and look like someone famous.

Contact Gene at: genepizz@gmail.com…

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How may I assist you?  Life as an SLP-A

How may I assist you? Life as an SLP-A

by Christine Botelho, BA

I have been a Speech Language Pathology Assistant for over 20 years, licensed in Massachusetts for 4 years (not all states require licensure). Use of Speech Language Pathology Assistants is not allowed in all areas of the Speech and Language field and it is not an easy position to acquire. I have been fortunate to have met Speech Language Pathologists who have given me the opportunities that I have had. I have worked in acute rehab settings, nursing homes, day hab programs, schools and private practice.

As an SLP-A , I have always worked with Speech Language Pathologists. Initially it is difficult to work with a new, unfamiliar SLP because of different treatment styles and expectations. I have found that the speech and language field can be extremely subjective.  A patient, given the same tests and acquiring the same results may have different goals and objectives created by different therapists.  The therapists may desire the same outcome yet approach the treatment from different directions.  Having had the opportunity to work with numerous Speech Language Pathologists has given me countless treatment strategies to refer to while I am working my patients.  Every SLP has their own style of treatment and each patient is an individual- what works for one patient may not work for the other.  It has been helpful to have multiple strategies to try.

My overall responsibility as an SLP-A is to comprehend the recommendations, goals and objectives of the supervising SLP and implement the treatment to maximize the patient’s success. An SLP-A needs to have a basic understanding of the disabilities they are working with. However, their greatest strength is in knowing what materials are available, with an ability to modify and create novel ones in order to motivate their patients.  I feel the optimal use of an SLP-A is to accomplish the “drill work” needed to attain the goals the SLP created.  Therefore, the needs of the patient and their rate of progress determines the ratio of SLP to SLP-A treatment.   ASHA has guidelines for supervision of SLP-A’s and I believe it is important to adhere to these in order to assure the best outcomes. In addition, as this website shows, it’s lonely out there! We need SLPs to bounce ideas off of and to make sure we are on the right track. Our training and experience only gets us so far. The SLP has the education and the responsibility to drive the treatment plan.

Often I look back over my career and remember my patients from the early days and think how much more I could help them, knowing what I know now. If my career has taught me anything it’s that we have to have an appreciation for what we don’t know with the courage to ask questions and continue to search for answers even in the most challenging situations. It is becoming too easy to blame the patients and families for a lack of progress instead confronting our own limitations. I enjoy learning new things in order to help my patients. One reason I like being an SLP-A is that you always have someone to consult and brainstorm with. It is harder to feel defeated when you are part of a team. My best experiences have been working with SLPs that share my ideology and philosophy.

As our field continues to grow and change, I would like to see SLP-A’s working with SLP’s all settings with services reimbursed by all insurances in order to reach as many patients as possible. After all, I bet everyone could use a little assistance.

About the Author

Christine Botelho is an SLP-A with a Bachelor’s Degree in Communication Disorders from Bridgewater State College. When not amazing her school based caseload with a variety of original materials, fun reinforcers and tireless energy, Chris can be found in southeastern Massachusets enjoying time with her family and learning archery.
Contact Chris at sb01@comcast.net.

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Thank you!

Thank you!

I am standing on my soap box right now and shouting out a big THANK YOU! to anyone visiting or returning to our site. We have been away a while but we have not forgotten about you or our craft. We continue to toil every day in our jobs, often alone with little to no recognition. So I am here right one to say THANK YOU to you for all that you do. For all of the endless hours you spend working with your patients, and thinking about your patients, and planning your treatments. For all of the follow-up that you do with families and physicians and teachers and payors- thank you for all that goes unnoticed and unacknowledged. You deserve a pat on the back and probably more. But right now, my words will have to suffice.

I hope this site will help you find support and be a place for your voice. And if you are in a position to thank someone for their work or their help, please do so. We don’t hear enough of that as professionals (or probably as people). My colleague just started a new job. After her first few days, she was sincerely thanked by her boss for her efforts and the contributions she had already brought to the team. She was appreciative, but also realized that the last time she had been thanked for her work was when she worked for me, and that was 10 years ago! That’s a long time to go without recognition, wouldn’t you say?

So before you start that e-mail, or note, or conversation or performance review, remember to say thank you, the person on the receiving end has probably done something worthy of recognition and might be happy and likely much more cooperative if you noticed it.

About the author

Lisa Yauch-Cadden was born and raised in the Detroit, Michigan area. She has a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology and a Master’s in Speech Language Pathology from the University of Michigan. She has worked as an SLP in nearly all facets of the field: skilled nursing facilities, home care, acute care, transitional care, medical offices and schools. Throughout her career as a therapist, manager and business owner, Lisa has never strayed from providing direct line service, including state of the art evaluations using FEES/FEESST and MBS. While she needs no accolades to do her job, she is deserving of many. Her tireless efforts to advance the best clinical practices in Speech Language Pathology have changed lives for her patients, her clinical fellows, and those of us lucky enough to work with her on a regular basis. Contact Lisa at lycslp@gmail.com.…

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I hope you had a good day

I hope you had a good day

By Lisa Yauch-Cadden

“I hope you had a good day”

My family and I are ABC News fans. I always loved Peter Jennings. I, like many people was saddened at his passing, and I thought my news program would never be the same. I liked Peter’s sense of gravity and calm. He was always well so spoken and articulate, even in times of crisis, even when he was speaking extemporaneously – now that was a man you could trust. I now like Diane Sawyer very much, better in fact than I thought I would. But in between Peter and Diane, there was Charlie Gibson, and I loved Charlie. I thought he was great on Good Morning America, was happy when they brought him back and was really happy when he picked up the evening news. He had a fatherly, folksy way of delivering the news, was also well spoken and he had a great sign off – “I’m Charles Gibson and I hope you had a good day”. I loved that! What a great way to end a newscast. After all the bad news he’d delivered, he encouraged us take a moment to reflect on our day, and for me, that was refreshing, because I rarely had an opportunity to think about that when I was working 8, 10, 12 hours a day and always wondering what I had to do next.

I find that even now, when I am working just 30-35 hours a week, primarily in one location, with very little travel, that I can still get caught up in my day; rushing from patient to patient, worrying about productivity, always thinking: What do I have to do next? What else can I get done? What have I left undone? What’s on the schedule for tomorrow? Only recently, have I been able to slow my thought processes to reflect on my day. Was it a good day? Did I make a difference? Did I help someone? Did I contribute? Lately, I have been able to answer “Yes” to these questions, and to answer Charlie, I am having more “good days”.

So what’s changed? My caseload is about the same as it was a year ago. It goes up and down with the hospital census (and the flu season). The out-patient schedule is fairly constant. The productivity demands are the same. There has been no significant change in personnel as it relates to my position. So the difference must be me. I have changed how I look at my job. I am still cognizant of the productivity demands. I am still accountable to lots of people, but my top priority is to be of service to my patients – to do the best job I can and to provide them with as much information as possible to make decisions about their care, as it relates to my portion of the treatment plan (usually swallowing). I spend time educating patients and families, reviewing MBSs in detail, providing treatment beyond just the diagnostic kind, establishing home programs and making sure they understand what their options are. I am not successful 100% of the time, but more often than not, I feel like I am making a difference. When I reflect on my day, I can say, “Yes, it was a good day”.

I think if we can all find those small moments, those 1 or 2 patients, that if not for you, they might not be doing as well, that through your knowledge or kindness, you improved the quality of their life or their opportunity for a better outcome. If we can reflect on those things at the end of the day, we can all have a good day and look forward to a better tomorrow.

About the author

Lisa Yauch-Cadden was born and raised in the Detroit, Michigan area. She has a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology and a Master’s in Speech Language Pathology from the University of Michigan. She has worked as an SLP in nearly all facets of the field: skilled nursing facilities, home care, acute care, transitional care, medical offices and schools. Throughout her career as a therapist, manager and business owner, Lisa has never strayed from providing direct line service, including state of the art evaluations using FEES/FEESST and MBS. While she needs no accolades to do her job, she is deserving of many. Her tireless efforts to advance the best clinical practices in Speech Language Pathology have changed lives for her patients, her clinical fellows, and those of us lucky enough to work with her on a regular basis. Contact Lisa at lycslp@gmail.com.

If you have something to say, please submit your article for consideration to lycslp@gmail.com. .…

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The Switch

The Switch

By Michelle Sachs Clapp, CCC-SLP

Back in 1998, I was working with the geriatric population in a SNF setting. The pay was good and I enjoyed my job- at least the direct contact with my clients and the camaraderie with my coworkers. What I didn’t like was the growing amount of redundant paperwork required of me and the increasing demands and tightening criteria of what counted as “direct” or billable time.

I was forced out of this setting by the changes in Medicare standards and the fact that I was a “dinosaur” in the field- I had over 15 years of experience as a speech/language pathologist and it cost agencies or facilities a lot more to keep me on or to hire me than a more recent graduate with less experience. After being “offered” a 33% pay cut along with the promise of a pink slip in a few months, I re-examined my career choice within my chosen field. The job market was not promising for me in light of my years of experience and the pay had been cut drastically, due to the new methods of reimbursement ( direct, billable time as opposed to salaried). I had two young children and although I didn’t have to work full time, I did still have to work to help pay the bills. I decided to apply for a position with a local early intervention agency that was advertising for a speech/language pathologist.

At my interview, I feigned great interest in working with little children, even though I felt that I had little patience for this population. I played up the experience I had from years and years ago working in the Head Start program and with elementary school children. Sure enough, a position was offered to me- 2 days after I was offered a per diem position with 3 SNF’s in a not-too distant town. I accepted the per diem position. Within 2 days on the job, I knew it was a mistake. Criteria for who qualified for my services severely restricted who I could work with, regardless of my professional opinion of who would benefit from my assistance. I could see that I would be spending a lot of time with minimal financial reimbursement. And the paperwork was quite overwhelming as well.

I called the early intervention agency that had offered me a position and indicated to them that I was still interested in them, if they were still interested in ME. They called back and our partnership began.

For the first year of my new career with little ones, it felt like I was paddling upstream; it had been years since I had worked with pediatrics and I was behind in skill, knowledge, lingo, etc. I worked directly with the children and their families during the day and studied and read up on pediatrics on my own in the evenings. After my first year there, I finally felt comfortable enough to start widening my knowledge base by taking on a more varied caseload, reading additional materials about non-speech/language issues with this very young population, and really listening to and doing co-visits with my non-SLP co-workers.

To summarize, I am now completing my 11th year working in early intervention! I love what I do. I feel like I rediscovered my field of work and put my heart into what I do. I feel very alive in my daily work and the rewards are priceless. The pay may not be as much as it is now in SNF’s, but the benefits (being paid with hugs, kisses and holiday photos) more than make up for the lack of monetary compensation. Way back when, when I was applying for this position, I thought that I was faking my enthusiasm about this population but much to my surprise, I discovered that I love love LOVE working with these little ones and their families! I have plenty of patience for them; I guess it was my OWN kids that I had the lack of patience with! Although, as I get a bit older, it gets a bit harder getting up and down off of the floor from my visits, I will continue to do so for as long as I can and will continue to learn about and take on the various challenges that working with the 0 to 3 year old population holds for me.

Michelle Sachs Clapp MA CCC SLP graduated from University of Delaware with a BA in Communications and completed her MA at Ohio University. Since entering the field, she has worked in a variety of treatment settings but finds her current position in early intervention to be her favorite. In addition to her career in Speech Language Pathology, she has honed her parenting skills over the years raising a daughter, son, and soon to be stepdaughter. Her happy home life is fully rounded out by the love and affection of her cat and dog. She has practiced Kundalini Yoga for the last 9 years which maybe how she maintains her charm and humor when life presents unexpected changes.

Michelle is a good friend and an excellent clinician. It was a distinct privilege to work with her so many years ago when our careers as SLP’s were shaken to the core by PPS. I am honored that she agreed to share her method for dealing with the January 1999 reimbursement changes for SNF’s. These regulations continue to test the patience and ethics of individual practitioners across the country. As we prepare for the next round of changes, Michelle’s experience serves as a timely reminder of all the opportunities our profession affords us.…

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R-E-S-P-E-C-T

R-E-S-P-E-C-T

By Lisa Yauch-Cadden

“R-E-S-P-E-C-T”

As someone who grew up in Motown, I know a little bit about Aretha Franklin and her mantra. As a clinician who has been around awhile, I know a lot about why it is so important.

In our business, we deal with all kinds of people: patients, families, physicians, nurses, therapists, case managers, social workers, insurance representatives, students, etc. Like any business that involves personal interaction, everyone has a perspective, an agenda, a point of view. In our role as a diagnostician/therapist, we may need to bring all of these perspectives together, and if we can’t bring them all together, we certainly need to appreciate them. Every person that works with/interacts with our patient has a perspective about that patient, and those perspectives may be important to us. When I evaluate a patient, I always try to ask them what they think the nature of their problem is. I also ask their family members: “What problems do you see?” “Why do you think they are occurring?” I canvas the nurses and the CNAs. I consult with the physician. I ask the treating clinician (CFY, SLP-A) who may be working with them. All of these people invariably know the patient better than I do and their insights are important to me and to the patient. When I come to a conclusion, I let patients/families know, “Here’s what I think”. I seek confirmation, when I can, (e.g., “Does this make sense with what you see at home?”). It provides for a better recommendation, usually leading to one the patient can live with (think: modified diet/thickened liquids).

I also have used this approach as a manager and find that staff generally do a better job when you treat them with respect. I know, novel concept. Having worked for managers that don’t share this philosophy, however, makes me think that this is may not be an intuitive strategy for some people. The concept, however, is simple. People have their own opinions and perspective, as do you, and like you, people think that they are right. As a manager, you need to appreciate that, and sometimes solicit that perspective, in order to come to a shared conclusion. Like you, people need to be validated. Once you let them know that their perspective has value, they are much more likely to hear your side of the story. And when that side doesn’t necessarily agree with theirs, or doesn’t give them what they want, you are less likely to have problems afterward, as long as you’ve told them the truth.

And that’s the second part of the equation: Tell the truth. Respect the person you are dealing with enough to let them know the truth. If they know you are being truthful, even if they don’t like what they are hearing, they are more likely to accept it. Isn’t that how you would like to be treated? Imagine what a world it would be if everyone acted this way.

About the author

Lisa Yauch-Cadden was born and raised in the Detroit, Michigan area. She has a Bachelor of Science degree in Biology and a Master’s in Speech Language Pathology from the University of Michigan. She has worked as an SLP in nearly all facets of the field: skilled nursing facilities, home care, acute care, transitional care, medical offices and schools. Throughout her career as a therapist, manager and business owner, Lisa has never strayed from providing direct line service, including state of the art evaluations using FEES/FEESST and MBS. While she needs no accolades to do her job, she is deserving of many. Her tireless efforts to advance the best clinical practices in Speech Language Pathology have changed lives for her patients, her clinical fellows, and those of us lucky enough to work with her on a regular basis. Contact Lisa at lycslp@gmail.com. .

If you have something to say, please submit your article for consideration to lycslp@gmail.com. .…

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My Guru

My Guru

By Matt Mullen

From the moment we are born a story is being told to us. Another way of saying this is that from the moment we are born, the world is being described to you by other people who have had it described to them, over and over, down through the ages. This description is neither good nor bad. It just is. This is fairly easy to see when one gives it any attention. However, something came before the story, that is your breath.

We enter this world on the inhale..we exit it on the exhale. Consider the power and potential in your breath. It is unique to you, you could say it’s your oldest friend, old reliable, never judging you, always looking out for you, even though we usually pay it little attention. It’s not jealous, however. Your breath stays loyal to you, far more loyal than your fickle, transitory thoughts. And the breath, when given a little love and attention will reward you with a treasure trove: calmness, expansion, peace. When we focus on our breath, we are reminded of our original voice, before the fleeting drama of the collective internal dialog began.

Our breath guides all of our bodily systems. The breath is the master regulator of these complex systems. The respiratory is an obvious one. However, the breath nourishes the cardiovascular, neurological, as well as the spiritual. Our bodies’ rhythm is set by this supreme conductor.  As you read these words are you thinking about your breath? Probably not. And yet, there it is, undivided, life giving.

If we consider that our world has been described to us, you could say that description is a type of division, a way of sorting things out to make sense of our reality. The ancient practice of Yoga reminds us that we are actually undivided. In fact, for all the millions of words written about Yoga, it’s simple definition is a union, to bring together, to yoke together. Breath is the very thing that brings us together, binding us as sentient beings. The breath IS yoga. The breath is whole, complete. Can the mind grasp this wholeness? Careful, it’s a trick question! To answer yes or no is to come from that very place of division. The mind considers the question. The breath moves through the question, unconcerned with contrasts and comparisons.

So, we can see that the breath is ever present, and thoughts are ever fleeting. Meditating on this simple fact is enough to soothe and quiet the mind. Please consider, when we speak about meditation we are not speaking about something that is a chore. Indeed, meditation is your natural sanctuary.

As we conclude this article, try this:

Sitting right where you are. Take a deep breath through your nose. Fill up! Gently hold the breath at the top of the inhale, slowly exhale, completely, also through the nose. Resume your natural breath. After a few moments. Try it again. This time think of your exhale like a faucet. Increase, or decrease the volume of your exhale, like you would a water faucet.
Observe how you feel. No judgement, just observe.

Thoughts imagine the present moment. Breath experiences it directly.

Enjoy the simple power of your breath. It’s truly yours, unique to you. Your oldest, most faithful friend!

Peace,  Matt Mullen

About the author

Matt Mullen is a massage therapist, yoga instructor, healthy living coach, father, friend, educator, and student of the universe. Along his journey he’s learned a little, but it was enough for him to realize that the questions are often much more important than the answers men conjure up to explain the unexplainable. Matt is available for consultations and individual appointments. Please contact him directly at maudeml@yahoo.com

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